Archive for May, 2016

Catching Up

by Oliver on Saturday, May 21st, 2016.

I haven’t posted anything for quite some time (which I feel a little bad about), so this is something of a randomly-themed catch-up post. According to my LinkedIn profile I’ve been doing this engineering management thing for about two years, which at least provides some explanation for a relative lack of technical-oriented blog posts. Of course in that time I have certainly not revoked my Github access, deleted all compilers/runtimes/IDEs/etc and entirely halted technical work, but the nature of the work of course has changed. In short, I don’t find myself doing so much “interesting” technical work that leads to blog-worthy posts and discoveries.

So what does the work look like at the moment? I’ll spare you the deep philosophical analysis – there are many, many (MANY) posts and indeed books on making the transition from a technical contributor to a team manager or lead of some sort. Right back at the beginning I did struggle with the temptation to continue coding and contribute also on my management tasks – it is difficult to do both adequately at the same time. More recently (and perhaps in my moments of less self-control) I do allow myself to do some technical contributions. These usually look like the following:

  • Cleaning up some long-standing technical debt that is getting in the way of the rest of the team being productive, but is not necessarily vital to their learning/growth or knowledge of our technology landscape.
  • Data analysis – usually ElasticSearch, Pig/Hive/Redshift/MapReduce jobs to find the answer to a non-critical but still important question.
  • Occasionally something far down the backlog that is a personal irritation for me, but is not in the critical path.
  • Something that enables the rest of the team in some way, or removes a piece of our technology stack that was previously only known by myself (i.e. removes the need for knowledge transfer)
  • Troubleshooting infrastructure (usually also coupled with data analysis).

I’d like to say I’ve been faithful to that list but I haven’t always. The most recent case was probably around a year ago I guess, when I decided I’d implement a minimum-speed data transfer monitor to our HLS server. This ended up taking several weeks and was a far more gnarly problem than I realised. The resulting code was also not of the highest standard – when you are not coding day-in and day-out, I find that my overall code quality and ability to perceive abstractions and the right model for a solution is impaired.

Otherwise, the tasks that I perhaps should be filling my day with (and this is not an exhaustive list, nor ordered, just whatever comes to mind right now) looks more like this:

  • Assessing the capacity and skills make up of the team on a regular basis, against our backlog and potential features we’d like to deliver. Do we have the right skills and are we managing the “bus factor”? If the answer is “no” (and it almost always is), I should be hiring.
  • Is the team able to deliver? Are there any blockers?
  • Is the team happy? Why or why not? What can I do to improve things for them?
  • How are the team-members going on their career paths? How can I facilitate their personal growth and helping them become better engineers?
  • What is the overall health of our services and client applications? Did we have any downtime last night? What do I need to jump on immediately to get these problems resolved? I would usually consider this the first item to check in my daily routine – if something has been down we need to get it back up and fix the problems as a matter of urgency.
  • What is the current state of our technical debt; are there any tactical or strategic processes we need to start in order to address it?
  • How are we matching up in terms of fitting in with technology standards in the rest of the organisation? Are we falling behind or leading the way in some areas? Are there any new approaches that have worked well for us that could be socialised amongst the rest of the organisation?
  • Are there any organisational pain-points that I can identify and attempt to gather consensus from my peer engineering managers? What could we change on a wider scale that would help the overall organisation deliver user value faster, or with higher quality?
  • Could we improve our testing processes?
  • How are we measuring up against our KPIs? Have we delivered something new recently that needs to be assessed for impact, and if so has it been a success or not matched up to expectations? Do we need to rethink our approach or iterate on that feature?
  • Somewhat related: have there been any OS or platform updates on any of our client platforms that might have introduced bugs that we need to address? Ideally we would be ahead of the curve and anticipate problems before they happen, but if you have a product that targets web browsers or Android phones, there are simply too many to adequately test ahead of general public releases before potential problems are discovered by the public.
  • Is there any free-range experimentation the team could be doing? Let’s have a one-day offsite to explore something new! (I usually schedule at least one offsite a month for this kind of thing, with a very loose agenda.)
  • How am I progressing on my career path? What aspects of engineering management am I perhaps not focussing enough on? What is the next thing I need to be learning?

I could probably go on and on about this for a whole day. After almost two years (and at several points before that) it is natural to question whether the engineering management track is the one I should be on. Much earlier (perhaps 6 months in) I was still quite unsure – if you are still contributing a lot of code as part of your day to day work, the answer to the question is that much harder to arrive at since you have blurred the lines of what your job description should look like. It is much easier to escape the reality of settling permanently on one side or the other.

Recently I had some conversations with people which involved talking in depth about either software development or engineering management. On the one hand, exploring the software development topics with someone, I definitely got the feeling that there was a lot I am getting progressively more and more rusty on. To get up to speed again I feel would take some reasonable effort on my part. In fact, one of the small technical debt “itches” I scratched at the end of last year was implementing a small application to consume from AWS Kinesis, do some minor massaging of the events and then inject them into ElasticSearch. I initially thought I’d write it in Scala, but the cognitive burden of learning the language at that point was too daunting. I ended up writing it in Java 8 (which I have to say is actually quite nice to use, compared to much older versions of Java) but this is not a struggle a competent engineer coding on a daily basis would typically have.

On the other hand, the conversations around engineering management felt like they could stretch on for ever. I could literally spend an entire day talking about some particular aspect of growing an organisation, or a team, or on technical decision-making (and frequently do). Some of this has been learned through trial and error, some by blind luck and I would say a decent amount through reading good books and the wonderful leadership/management training course at SoundCloud (otherwise known as LUMAS). I and many other first-time managers took this course (in several phases) starting not long after I started managing the team, and I think I gained a lot from it. Unfortunately it’s not something anyone can simply take, but at least I’d like to recommend some of the books we were given during the course – I felt I got a lot out of them as well.

  • Conscious Business by Fred Kofman. It might start out a bit hand-wavy, and feel like it is the zen master approach to leadership but if you persist you’ll find a very honest, ethical approach to business and leadership. I found it very compelling.
  • Five Dysfunctions of a Team by Patrick Lencioni. A great book, and very easy read with many compelling stories as examples – for building healthy teams. Applying the lessons is a whole different story, and I would not say it is easy by any measure. But avoiding it is also a path to failure.
  • Leadership Presence by Kathy Lubar and Belle Linda Halpern. Being honest and genuine, knowing yourself, establishing a genuine connection and empathy to others around you and many other gems within this book are essential to being a competent leader. I think this is a book I’ll keep coming back to for quite some time.

In addition I read a couple of books on Toyota and their lean approach to business (they are continually referenced in software development best practices). I have to admit that making a solid connection between all of TPS can be a challenge, and I hope to further learn about them in future and figure out which parts are actually relevant and which parts are not. There were a few other books around negotiation and other aspects of leadership which coloured my thinking but were not significant enough to list. That said, I still have something like 63 books on my wish list still to be ordered and read!

In order to remain “relevant” and in touch with technical topics I don’t want to stop programming, of course, but this will have to remain in the personal domain. To that end I’m currently taking a game programming course in Unity (so, C#) and another around 3D modelling using Blender. Eventually I’ll get back to the machine learning courses I was taking a long time ago but still need to re-take some beginner linear algebra in order to understand the ML concepts properly. Then there are a tonne of other personal projects in various languages and to various ends. I’ll just keep fooling myself that I’ll have free time for all of these things 🙂

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Saturday, May 21st, 2016 Tech, Thoughts No Comments